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Mandarin Orange Scones

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Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade.

This post is sponsored in conjunction with #SpringSweetsWeek. I received product samples from sponsor companies to help in the creation of the #SpringSweetsWeek recipes. All opinions are mine alone.

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek

If you’re like me, the only Mandarin oranges you’ve had are from a can. I don’t think I remember eating a Mandarin orange fresh until I received some from Melissa’s Produce. I’m sure you have the same questions I did about these orange globes of goodness.

There are so many names for these delicious citrus fruits.

There are tangerines, Mandarin oranges, satsumas, and clementines. Then there’s the varieties of each like cuties and sweeties. As you can tell by the names, they’re sweet.

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek

 

What are Mandarin oranges?

We all know that Mandarin oranges are part of the orange family. But, did you know that genetic studies indicate that it was one of the original orange species? These include pomelo, citrons, papedas, kumquats, trifoliate orange (pretty much any orange with three leaves), and Australian and New Guinea species.

Mandarin oranges have a thinner peel than regular oranges. They’re sweeter with a stronger orange flavor, I think, than the other oranges. I don’t think for one second that because the skin is thinner it has less flavor or less zest. It’s more concentrated in my opinion.

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek

 

What is the difference between Mandarin oranges and the others?

Sort like all squares are rectangles but not all rectangles are squares. If that makes sense. All tangerines are Mandarins but not all Mandarins are tangerines. Tangerines, clementines, and satsumas are all types of Mandarin oranges.

Tangerines and clementines are more cold weather tolerant making them great for growing in parts of the US. However, clementines are smaller and sweeter than tangerines. They’re typically marketed with brand names like Halo and Cuties.

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek

Satsumas get damaged in shipping fairly easily. These are not typically found in stores. However, they’re a great patio plant to grow. They are lighter in color and seedless. Satsumas are the easiest to peel which is why they get damaged easily during shipping.

No matter what Mandarin orange you grab at the store, they’re sure to be sweet and perfectly pop-able into your mouth. They’re easy to peel which makes them a perfect work or school snack, too.

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek

 

Where do Mandarin oranges come from?

Mandarin oranges have an interesting history. They originated India about 3000 years ago. They travelled to China, Europe, North America, and Australia before landing in other countries across the world.

Explorers brought these round gems from China to England where they started cultivating them in 1805. From there cultivation spread to Italy where it was widely cultivated and expanded throughout other Mediterranean countries. Eventually the Mandarin orange made it’s way to the Australia in the 1820s and the US in the 1840s.

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek

 

How did Mandarin oranges get their name?

The Mandarin orange gained its name when it arrived in England. The Mandarin public officials had brightly orange-colored robes. It was this color that inspired the name of Mandarin orange. As a side note, the tangerine is name for its place of origin, Tangiers.

Mandarin oranges also have a cultural significance. During the Chinese New Year, they are a symbol of abundance and good fortune. They are usually given as gifts and displayed as decoration. When the Japanese immigrants came to North American, they brought the tradition of giving them as gifts with them. That is why some will find a Mandarin orange or tangerine in their stocking on Christmas.

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek

 

How do Mandarin orange scones taste?

I’m sure you’re saying to yourself, “These look like biscuits and not scones!” Scones don’t have to be wedge shaped. In fact, other countries cut them out like biscuits. The difference being these have a slightly sweet flavor where biscuits usually do not. These scones have less sugar than you’re typical American wedge scone, too. That allows for delicious kumquat marmalade on top.

And they’re tender with a hint of Mandarin orange flavor. The citrus flavor is just enough to accent some marmalade or some clotted cream. It could even stand up to some curd! Or just top them with a little butter and savor the delicate Mandarin orange flavor.

Signature

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek
Yield: 16

Mandarin Orange Scones

Cook Time: 12 minutes
Total Time: 12 minutes

Mandarin Orange Scones are tender, flaky, and full of orange flavor.  Serve with clotted cream and Kumquat marmalade. #SpringSweetsWeek

Ingredients

  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 6 tablespoons butter, cut into pieces
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste
  • 1 tablespoon Mandarin orange zest
  • 3 tablespoon Mandarin orange juice

Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 400.
    2. Combine flour with the salt, baking powder, and baking soda in the bowl of a food processor.
    3. Drop the butter pieces into the food processor on top of the flour mixture.
    4. Pulse 15 to 20 times or until the mixture resembles a fine meal with no large pieces.
    5. Pour the mixture into a mixing bowl and make a well in the center.
    6. Combine the milk with the sour cream, sugar, and vanilla and stir until combined. Stir in the lemon zest and juice.
    7. Using a dough whisk (or a wooden spoon) stir until the mixtures begins to form a ball.
    8. Turn the dough out on to a floured work surface and knead lightly. Roll or press the dough out to one inch and cut the dough with a biscuit cutter (or you could use a knife and cut it into wedges).
    9. Place the scones on a silpat lined baking sheet and bake at 400 for 25 to 30 minutes.
    10. Store in an airtight container for up to a week, if they last that long.

Nutrition Information

Yield

16

Serving Size

1

Amount Per Serving Calories 164Total Fat 6gSaturated Fat 4gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 2gCholesterol 16mgSodium 232mgCarbohydrates 24gFiber 1gSugar 6gProtein 3g

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